Oui, mais pourquoi?

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ingodwetrustnyc:

©Daniel Naudé, Group of Ankole cattle. Kiruhura district, Western Region, Uganda, 2012

Pis après ça, les gens comprennent pas pourquoi je trouve que ça fait peur, des vaches. 

ingodwetrustnyc:

©Daniel Naudé, Group of Ankole cattle. Kiruhura district, Western Region, Uganda, 2012

Pis après ça, les gens comprennent pas pourquoi je trouve que ça fait peur, des vaches. 

(Source : artafrica)

humansofnewyork:

“They are taking control of the water supply. They are breaking dams, and flooding crops, and destroying the food supply of an entire country. They are forcing hundreds of thousands from their homes. It seems that there is a hand behind all of this. They are very calculating. They are making their moves very carefully to destroy the human soul. They want to rob an entire people of food and water and homes, as if to wipe them from the pages of history. And when they take the homes from these people, the children have no place to play. The children have no place to be young. No physical space, and no emotional space. They have no place to be a child, so their only frame of reference is war and fighting. And when that’s all they know, how can they grow up to be doctors and teachers? All they can possibly know is the desire for revenge and hatred for their enemies. I wish people would understand that Iraq is filled with intelligent, civilized people. This was the cradle of civilization in the Ancient World. Even the Garden of Eden was here. These aren’t dust covered, nameless refugees being forced from their homes. The refugee camps are filled with architects, and musicians, and teachers.”

humansofnewyork:

“They are taking control of the water supply. They are breaking dams, and flooding crops, and destroying the food supply of an entire country. They are forcing hundreds of thousands from their homes. It seems that there is a hand behind all of this. They are very calculating. They are making their moves very carefully to destroy the human soul. They want to rob an entire people of food and water and homes, as if to wipe them from the pages of history. And when they take the homes from these people, the children have no place to play. The children have no place to be young. No physical space, and no emotional space. They have no place to be a child, so their only frame of reference is war and fighting. And when that’s all they know, how can they grow up to be doctors and teachers? All they can possibly know is the desire for revenge and hatred for their enemies. I wish people would understand that Iraq is filled with intelligent, civilized people. This was the cradle of civilization in the Ancient World. Even the Garden of Eden was here. These aren’t dust covered, nameless refugees being forced from their homes. The refugee camps are filled with architects, and musicians, and teachers.”

thingsorganizedneatly:

Japanese Boxwood Combs from Nalata Nalata
Photography by Armando Rafael

thingsorganizedneatly:

Japanese Boxwood Combs from Nalata Nalata

Photography by Armando Rafael

ivoryathena:

Badass women from history

  1. Leather clad English rocker girl
  2. Women boxing on a roof in LA (1933)
  3. Ellen O’Neal, the greatest woman freestyle skateboarder in the 1970s
  4. Elspeth Beard, first Englishwoman to circumnavigate the world by motorcycle

jtotheizzoe:

generalelectric:

Pictured above is the world’s largest indoor farm illuminated by LEDs, which opened this month in Japan. Inside, 18 cultivation racks reach 15 levels high, and are outfitted with 17,500 GE LED light fixtures developed specifically for this facility. The indoor farm can grow lettuce two-and-a-half times faster than an outdoor farm, and is already producing 10,000 heads of it per day. Read more about this breakthrough in modern farming at GE Reports.   

Can you imagine showing this to a farmer who was alive and planting just 50 years ago? They’d think we were space aliens.

moma:

Alexander Calder was born today in 1898. The existentialist philosopher Jean–Paul Sartre praised Calder’s mobiles, describing them as “lyrical invention.” 
[Alexander Calder. Untitled. 1939.] 

moma:

Alexander Calder was born today in 1898. The existentialist philosopher Jean–Paul Sartre praised Calder’s mobiles, describing them as “lyrical invention.” 

[Alexander Calder. Untitled. 1939.] 

stevemccurrystudios:

If man has no tea in him, he is incapable of
understanding truth and beauty.  

- Japanese Proverb

We haven’t had any tea for a week.
The bottom is out of the Universe.
- Rudyard Kipling

Exhibition at Leica Gallery, Salzburg, Austria
Opening August 8, 2014

https://twitter.com/McCurryStudios

itscolossal:

Haunting Photos of the German Countryside Reveal Scars Left from WWII Bombs

We live in an age of sound bites, and there is something about learning how to speak effectively and in small ways that is important. Say big things in small ways.

-

NPR creative director Liz Danzico on The Great Discontent. Pair with Neil deGrasse Tyson on the art of the soundbite

Legendary anthropologist Margaret Mead once wrote:

If one cannot state a matter clearly enough so that even an intelligent twelve-year-old can understand it, one should remain within the cloistered walls of the university and laboratory until one gets a better grasp of one’s subject matter.

Previous TGD interviews have included Debbie MillmanAustin KleonJohn Maeda, and yours truly.

(via explore-blog)

explore-blog:

Absolutely wonderful short film about artist Maira Kalman, patron saint of the moments inside the moments inside the moments.

explore-blog:

Absolutely wonderful short film about artist Maira Kalman, patron saint of the moments inside the moments inside the moments.