Oui, mais pourquoi?

RSS

stevemccurrystudios:

"To read is to fly: it is to soar to a point of vantage which gives a view over wide terrains of history, human variety, ideas, shared experience and the fruits of many inquiries. 

 - A C Grayling, Financial Times (in a review of A History of Reading by Alberto Manguel)

Please visit our Wordpress blog:

http://www.stevemccurry.wordpress.com

Neil DeGrasse Tyson Said What He Thinks About Race Now That He's Made It, And Almost Nobody Noticed

dynastylnoire:

He goes in

J’adore cet homme!

(Source : jessehimself)

jtotheizzoe:

boop.
This man.

jtotheizzoe:

boop.

This man.

itscolossal:

Tomcat BrothersPiotr Jabłoński

jtotheizzoe:

compoundchem:

Version 1 of ‘A Rough Guide to Spotting Bad Science’. Thanks for everyone’s suggestions earlier in the week, attempted to include as many of them as possible!
Download link here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-ap

Approach the world with an open mind, but not so open that your brains fall out.
Here’s a list of tips on how to weigh good science from bad. Combine that with my video on “How to Read Science News" and you’ll be in pretty good shape and shall never be led astray: 

jtotheizzoe:

compoundchem:

Version 1 of ‘A Rough Guide to Spotting Bad Science’. Thanks for everyone’s suggestions earlier in the week, attempted to include as many of them as possible!

Download link here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-ap

Approach the world with an open mind, but not so open that your brains fall out.

Here’s a list of tips on how to weigh good science from bad. Combine that with my video on “How to Read Science News" and you’ll be in pretty good shape and shall never be led astray: 

Avr 8
explore-blog:

Isaac Asimov on fiction vs. science fiction, one of his many insightful observations in this 1989 conversation with Bill Moyers. 

explore-blog:

Isaac Asimov on fiction vs. science fiction, one of his many insightful observations in this 1989 conversation with Bill Moyers

Avr 8
jtotheizzoe:

8bitfuture:

Every major recorded earthquake since 1898, showing how Earth is put together. 

Whole lotta shakin’ going on.

jtotheizzoe:

8bitfuture:

Every major recorded earthquake since 1898, showing how Earth is put together.

Whole lotta shakin’ going on.

(Source : twitter.com)

Avr 4

photojojo:

The photography world lost one its most gifted contributors today with the death of veteran AP photojournalist Anja Niedringhaus in Afghanistan. 

For the past few years, Anja was able to shed light on the realities of war in Afghanistan in a way that only a photojournalist of her caliber could pull off. See more of her incredible work below. 

Remembering a Legendary Photojournalist

Avr 1

blackscientistsandinventors:

Because of Them We Can … Be Scientists and Inventors PART 1!!!!!

Dr Patricia Bath

George Washington Carver

Dr. Mae Jemison

Benjamin Banneker

John Lee Love

biomedicalephemera:

Important People of Medicine: Virginia Apgar
If you’ve ever had, or been around a baby that was born in a hospital, Dr. Apgar’s name probably sounds familiar. An anesthesiologist and teratologist (one who studies abnormalities of physical development), Virginia Apgar is most well-known for the "Apgar score" - a rating given to infants at 1 and 5 minutes after birth, which is often a determining factor in whether or not the baby needs to remain in the hospital after birth.
Dr. Apgar was the first female doctor to receive professorship at Columbia University medical school, and her work in teratology during the rubella pandemic of 1964-65 led to her outspoken advocacy for universal vaccination against that disease. Though it’s often mild and annoying above all else in healthy people, when pregnant women contract rubella (also known as German measles), the rate of deformity and disability of their children skyrockets. It can even cause miscarriage.
Virginia Apgar also promoted universal Rh-testing among pregnant women. This test shows whether a woman has a different Rh blood type than her fetus, because if she does, she can develop antibodies that can cross the placenta and destroy fetal blood cells. This can cause fetal hydrops and high levels of neonatal mortality, but can be prevented by administering anti-RhD IgG injections to the mother during pregnancy, so that she does not develop a sensitivity (and subsequent antibodies) to her baby’s blood type.
Though Dr. Apgar never married or had children of her own, she saved the lives of countless babies and streamlined many medical considerations of neonatal care, resulting in more effective medical treatment. She studied and promoted the prevention of premature births and causes of fetal deformity. She worked for March of Dimes and taught thousands of students. Her influence in the obstetrics and neonatology fields cannot be overstated.

biomedicalephemera:

Important People of Medicine: Virginia Apgar

If you’ve ever had, or been around a baby that was born in a hospital, Dr. Apgar’s name probably sounds familiar. An anesthesiologist and teratologist (one who studies abnormalities of physical development), Virginia Apgar is most well-known for the "Apgar score" - a rating given to infants at 1 and 5 minutes after birth, which is often a determining factor in whether or not the baby needs to remain in the hospital after birth.

Dr. Apgar was the first female doctor to receive professorship at Columbia University medical school, and her work in teratology during the rubella pandemic of 1964-65 led to her outspoken advocacy for universal vaccination against that disease. Though it’s often mild and annoying above all else in healthy people, when pregnant women contract rubella (also known as German measles), the rate of deformity and disability of their children skyrockets. It can even cause miscarriage.

Virginia Apgar also promoted universal Rh-testing among pregnant women. This test shows whether a woman has a different Rh blood type than her fetus, because if she does, she can develop antibodies that can cross the placenta and destroy fetal blood cells. This can cause fetal hydrops and high levels of neonatal mortality, but can be prevented by administering anti-RhD IgG injections to the mother during pregnancy, so that she does not develop a sensitivity (and subsequent antibodies) to her baby’s blood type.

Though Dr. Apgar never married or had children of her own, she saved the lives of countless babies and streamlined many medical considerations of neonatal care, resulting in more effective medical treatment. She studied and promoted the prevention of premature births and causes of fetal deformity. She worked for March of Dimes and taught thousands of students. Her influence in the obstetrics and neonatology fields cannot be overstated.